Celebrate Michelangelo’s Birthday with a Story

Ciao, amici! Today is a special day. March 6, 1475 was the birthday of none other than Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, a man so talented in so many things, he was known as il divino, or the divine one.

Michelangelo

The world has changed a lot in the 544 years since his birth, but the quality of his work lives on, more than standing the test of time. Sculptures like David and Dusk and Dawn (the Tomb of Lorenzo di Medici), paintings like The Creation of Adam and The Last Judgment, architecture like the Laurentian Library and Piazza del Campidoglio, and numerous drawings and poems have, in a way, made the man immortal.

Which, when I think about it, is kind of funny. Because when I wrote my Medici Protectorate series, Michelangelo was still alive — thanks to a feat of alchemy — and was a vital character in the series. He can tell you all about it himself (you can read my interview with him here* or Lisa Burton’s interview with him here), or you can visit the Medici Protectorate Series page to learn more.

As you go about your day today, I hope you take a moment to enjoy a form of art: painting, song, literature, etc. And when you do, I hope you think of il divono.

Happy Birthday, Michelangelo.


*Note: The book cover pictured on the interview page is the original version. The series has since been updated to look like the covers above.

42 thoughts on “Celebrate Michelangelo’s Birthday with a Story

Add yours

    1. Ah, Julie, you’re getting ahead of yourself. Remember, Mike works for il capo, who is in hiding. No one gets to meet him in person except for his number one. But I promise, readers do get to meet him by the end. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Happy Birthday to the master and wow, what a grand name! ๐Ÿ˜€ It is astonishing what he achieved in his lifetime and how relevant and central is work still is in our lives centuries on! A great post and a clever link with your books. I must admit I’ve never closely checked out the Medici series but reading about it I am very intrigued and captivated. I am noting the first one down and hope to read it soon. Have a superb weekend,Staci! ๐Ÿ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow, thanks, Annika. I appreciate the interest and support.

      Michelangelo was and is one of the most influential talents to ever have lived. I look forward to the day when I can see some of his work in person.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Staci, I hope you do get to see his work in person. I was in Florence a few years ago and was agog at the art we saw, including Michelangeloโ€™s! Before we left I hoped I wouldnโ€™t be disappointed…no fear! It was amazing and I felt uplifted and inspired throughout!๐Ÿ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I love hearing about people’s experiences in Italy. (All travels, actually.) It lets me live vicariously through them until I can do these things myself. Thanks for sharing.

        Like

  2. When I was in Italy this summer, I was amazed at how much this man influenced the art and architecture of the country. His influence was everywhere. His amazing statue of David is a masterpiece and was finished when he was only 26 years old. I could barely write my name at that age. He was truly a talented man in so many different areas – painter, sculptor, architect…

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Maybe you could visit? How exciting for Pittsburg. I know someday you will stand next to the statue of David and in the Sistine Chapel:)

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Staci, I enjoyed the Medici series. I hope you consider bringing those characters back at some point.

    I am appreciating some music currently, but will be enjoying a good book this evening. DiVinci was a great inspiration. I’m happy to learn a bit more about him.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. What a great post. I had no idea it was his birthday, but it doesn’t surprise me that you’d know that ๐Ÿ™‚

    It’s truly mind-boggling at all he accomplished.He definitely left his mark on the world.

    And your Medici Protectorate series left a mark with me. I miss the Brotherhood and the sisters. Here’s hoping many other readers discover them in your excellent books!

    Liked by 3 people

Your turn...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: